About

Semantic Disposition is brought to you by the letter λ and by Ezra Keshet, Assistant Professor of Linguistics and Philosophy (by courtesy).

In case you were wondering, the title comes from a line in Hamlet, Act I, Scene v:

There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio,
Than are dreamt of in your philosophy. But come;
Here, as before, never, so help you mercy,
How strange or odd soe’er I bear myself,
As I perchance hereafter shall think meet
To put an antic disposition on,
That you, at such times seeing me, never shall,
With arms encumber’d thus, or this headshake,
Or by pronouncing of some doubtful phrase,
As ‘Well, well, we know,’ or ‘We could, an if we would,’
Or ‘If we list to speak,’ or ‘There be, an if they might,’
Or such ambiguous giving out, to note
That you know aught of me: this not to do,
So grace and mercy at your most need help you, Swear.

So, did I name the blog “Semantic Disposition” because I think semantic analysis often involves “pronouncing of some doubtful phrase” or “ambiguous giving out”? Or does “semantic” simply end in “antic” and the domain name was available? I’ll never tell.

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